New Interactive Map of Burrard Inlet

New Interactive Map of Burrard Inlet

News & UpdatesNew Interactive Map of Burrard Inlet

New Interactive Map of Burrard Inlet

Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s way of life is dependent on a healthy Burrard Inlet. We take care of the Inlet, and it takes care of us.

Over 90% of our food was from the marine environment before Europeans arrived, with clams, herring and salmon being some of our most important food sources. Since European contact, however, development and resource use has degraded the health of the inlet to the point that we can’t harvest clams due to contamination, herring have been largely absent for over a century after a dynamite fishery destroyed populations in the late 1800s, and salmon are collapsing across the coast.

These impacts exceed what is allowable under TWN law and infringe on our inherent and constitutionally-protected Aboriginal rights under Canadian law.

TWN has published new evidence detailing some of these impacts, including how contamination, destructive fishing, and shoreline development have impacted Burrard, leaving minimal opportunities for TWN to harvest many culturally important species.

These large-scale and long-term impacts are difficult to convey from TWN’s perspective, so we’ve produced an interactive map to visualize some of the major impacts of colonial development in Burrard Inlet.

If you are interested in seeing where the shoreline was before Vancouver was a city, how many storm sewers empty into False Creek, or where urban development has paved over old streams, then take a look at this new interactive map:

https://twn.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=3fc2979e988e429eae1a5ff0a91d6ae6

Take time to check out the map where you can scroll around, zoom in, and click on icons and points to learn more.

Latest Articles

“səlilwətaɬ Chief and Council are incredibly pleased to see the poles by carver Jonas Jones welcome everyone to Whey-ah-Wichen and təmtəmíxʷtən. These traditional village sites hold deep importance to our Tsleil-Waututh people, and we are pleased to have them connected in this culturally significant way. Our hands are raised in appreciation of the ongoing collaboration with our partners at Metro Vancouver and the District of North Vancouver for making this project a success.”  -Chief Jen Thomas, səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation)
The Boys Who Braid Their Hair exhibition has been extended and you’re invited! Join us from April 25 – May 19, 2024 Where: The Nature House at MapleWood Flats  Open: Tues / Thurs / Sat & Sun 11:00am – 3:00pm
ur səlilwətaɬ Speed Watch program has released critical findings from their activations over the past six months, which were led by the TWN Community Safety team and member volunteers. They found that while 85% of vehicles passing through the community along Dollarton Highway are essentially complying with the speed limit, 13% of vehicles are doing 11 km/h to 20 km/h over the speed limit, and 2% of vehicles are doing more than 20 km/h over the speed limit.
Robert Bartlett, Chief Administrative Officer (CAO) of səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil-Waututh Nation), shares the following reflection after his first month as CAO.
səlilwətaɬ (Tsleil Waututh Nation) would like to invite the community to the The Boys Who Braid Their Hair Exhibition, a cultural celebration and exploration of the meaning behind the braid, showcasing the powerful narratives of boys and men who embrace their spiritual connection through the beauty of hair. The exhibit aims to celebrate cultural diversity, challenge stereotypes, and promote inclusivity by showcasing the art and cultural significance of boys and men braiding their hair.
Planning and design work are currently underway for the Spirit Trail’s eastern extension in North Vancouver. This extension aims to establish a continuous active transportation connection, linking key destinations and neighborhoods east of the Seymour River once completed.