Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s xʔəlilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed Integrated Stewardship Plan

Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s xʔəlilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed Integrated Stewardship Plan

News & UpdatesTsleil-Waututh Nation’s xʔəlilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed Integrated Stewardship Plan

Tsleil-Waututh Nation’s xʔəlilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed Integrated Stewardship Plan

The xʔəl̓ilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed is located approximately 30 kilometres northeast of Vancouver and is the southernmost fjord on the west coast of North America. It is surrounded by the Seymour, Stawamus, Mamquam, Pitt, and Coquitlam Watersheds.

Tsleil-Waututh oral history teaches that the Tsleil-Waututh people have always belonged to, and have accepted responsibility for the care of, the lands and waters within their traditional territory. More recent management by Crown governments has been fragmented, and it has diminished environmental and cultural values.

Seizing the opportunity presented by the Province of British Columbia through the Sea-to-Sky Land and Resource Management Plan process, Tsleil-Waututh proposed a watershed-level planning process for the xʔəl̓ilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed. In December 2005, Tsleil-Waututh and the Province signed a Partnership Agreement for the collaborative development of an Integrated Stewardship Plan. This process was led by Tsleil-Waututh, and it was one of the first collaborations of its kind in the province.

Tsleil-Waututh has been working for decades to reach this agreement. Since 2005 they have reintroduced Roosevelt elk and helped salmon stocks rebound. The changes have had cascading effects: Herring have returned to the inlet, and wolves and cougars returned on the heels of the elk. The work continues today, as the Nation’s environmental crews carefully extract creosote-soaked pylons where log booms were once moored.

Download and read the xʔəl̓ilwətaʔɬ/Indian River Watershed Integrated Stewardship Plan here.

Read the Globe and Mail Article: An urban First Nation reclaims stewardship over vast rainforest on Metro Vancouver’s doorstep – The Globe and Mail

 

Latest Articles

MST Development, featuring Chief Jen Thomas of Tsleil-Waututh Nation, alongside Chief Wayne Sparrow of Musqueam Band, and Council Chairperson Khelsilem of Squamish Nation, has been named top 3 in Vancouver Magazine’s 22nd Annual Power 50 for 2023.
‘Protect Our Land’ is a song written and recorded by a group of our youth from the Tsleil-Waututh Nation siʔáḿθɘt school. The song and accompanying music video were produced by N’we Jinan, a travelling, Indigenous-led studio that works with First Nations youth across Canada.
Congratulations to Warrior Plumbing and Curtis Thomas, President and Business Development, for winning a 2022 BC Indigenous Business Award for “Business of the Year 11+ person enterprise”.
Today, October 25, 2022, Vancouver City Council passed the City of Vancouver’s United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) Strategy, as recommended by a Task Force led by the Musqueam Indian Band, Squamish Nation, and Tsleil-Waututh Nation. The adoption of the UNDRIP Strategy is historic, positioning Vancouver as a national and global leader in implementing a clear way forward towards reconciliation.
On October 19, 2022, members of Musqueam Indian Band, Squamish Nation, and Tsleil-Waututh Nation alongside City of Vancouver elected officials, staff, and invited guests celebrated the release of the City of Vancouver’s UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People (UNDRIP) Strategy. Learn more about the event and the importance of this report.
Today, in partnership with Musqueam Indian Band, Squamish Nation, and Tsleil-Waututh Nation, the City of Vancouver’s United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) Task Force provided their final report and calls to action for City Council as Vancouver seeks to implement its UNDRIP strategy. The calls to action in the final report are the first of their kind in Canada. Learn more.