Tsleil-Waututh Nation Releases 2021-2022 Annual Report

Tsleil-Waututh Nation Releases 2021-2022 Annual Report

News & UpdatesTsleil-Waututh Nation Releases 2021-2022 Annual Report

Tsleil-Waututh Nation Releases 2021-2022 Annual Report

Tsleil-Waututh Nation (TWN) is pleased to share our 2021-2022 Annual Report with membership.

 

While we continued to navigate the challenges of the pandemic, we pursued and initiated various major projects and achieved many milestones during the 2021-2022 year. The annual report highlights the successes and challenges of the previous year by reporting on TWN’s operational and financial performance.

 

The needs of our Tsleil-Waututh community drive our Nation’s work. Our priorities are clear: to take care of our youth and our Elders, support education, improve housing, enhance economic development opportunities, champion environmental stewardship, and much more.

 

The report includes messages from our Chief and Chief Administrative Officer, an organizational chart, and a snapshot of our Membership growth over the past decade. The report is divided into seven sections to represent our departments’ work as well as our financial statements.

 

We hope that membership finds this report useful in understanding how the Nation has worked towards restoring and protecting our language, culture, and traditions, as well as building capacity within our community. By doing so, we are placing the face of Tsleil-Waututh Nation back on our traditional territory. As səlilwətaɬ, “People of the Inlet,” our birthright and obligation is to care for the lands and waters of our territory to ensure future generations can thrive here.

 

Click the button below to read the TWN 2021-2022 Annual Report. If you prefer a print version, copies are available from reception in the Administration building.

 

Disclaimer: The material contained within this annual report is property of Tsleil-Waututh Nation. Please do not reproduce this material.

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