Tsleil-Waututh measure erosion, pollution and overfishing since contact and industrialization in Burrard Inlet

Tsleil-Waututh measure erosion, pollution and overfishing since contact and industrialization in Burrard Inlet

News & UpdatesTsleil-Waututh measure erosion, pollution and overfishing since contact and industrialization in Burrard Inlet

Tsleil-Waututh measure erosion, pollution and overfishing since contact and industrialization in Burrard Inlet

This week Chief Jen, Bones, Gabe George, and Mike George went out on one of the TLR boats for an interview with the Vancouver Sun. The purpose of the interview was to discuss cumulative effects in Burrard Inlet and highlight the incredible work that is being done by Tsleil-Waututh.

Between 1792 and 2020, according to three reports released, Burrard Inlet lost 1,214 hectares of intertidal and subtidal areas to development and erosion. Not for a long time now could one canoe from Burrard Inlet to East Vancouver; Stanley Park long ago quit becoming an island at high tide.

TWN’s way of life is dependent on a healthy Burrard Inlet. We took care of the Inlet and it took care of us.

Read the Vancouver Sun Article here:

Review the findings in the reports:

Tsleil-Waututh Nation Research Report

A review of Burrard Inlet water quality data to understand the impacts of contamination on TsleilWaututh Nation’s safe harvesting practices

Fisheries Centre Research Reports:

Historical Ecology in Burrard Inlet: Summary of Historic, Oral History, Ethnographic, and Traditional Use Information

Fisheries Centre Research Reports:

Reconstructing the pre-contact shoreline of Burrard Inlet (British Columbia, Canada) to quantify cumulative intertidal and subtidal area change from 1792 to 2020

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The Tsleil-Waututh Nation community will take part in a pilgrimage to commemorate the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation. Walking from the site of the former St. Paul’s Residential School, community members, TWN staff, and invited guests will walk 8.5 kilometers back home to the Tsleil-Waututh reserve, located along Dollarton Highway. Members taking part will be wearing orange shirts and carrying signage to acknowledge Tsleil-Waututh Nation residential school survivors and ancestors.
A proud member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Andrea Crossan has been appointed as Asper Visiting Professor for the Winter 2022 Academic Year at the School of Journalism, Writing, and Media at the University of British Columbia.
On June 27 – July 1 2022, Treaty, Lands and Resources (TLR) staff Carleen Thomas, Hillary Hyland and Jessica Steele attended the UN Ocean Conference in Lisbon, Portugal. The Governments of Kenya and Portugal co-hosted the conference whose theme was: Scaling up Ocean Action Based on Science and Innovation for Sustainable Development Goal 14: Stocktaking, Partnerships and Solutions.
On June 17, there was a beautiful celebration in this beautiful city that is home to Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish people, explains Gabriel George, Director of Treaty Lands and Resources. In the colonisation of these lands we were erased, and today some of the erasure was undone. Our collective Nations came together and put a name on this beautiful park. The names are: sθәqәlxenәm in the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ language and ts’exwts’áxwi7 in the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh language.
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Last week, the Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Environment and Climate Change Canada celebrated their landmark, first-of-its-kindagreement to co-manage Disposal at Sea within Burrard Inlet, with their Agreement on Collaborative Decision Making Regarding Disposal at Sea.